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HELOC Notes Found to be Nonnegotiable Under Florida Law

August 6, 2018

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Editors’ Note:  While we love complex restructuring and insolvency proceedings, a plain old suit on a note must be handled correctly as well (that did not happen in the case below).  Jonathon Nicol in BCLP’s Kansas City office handles credit litigation around the country with expertise.  Every aspect of commercial litigation must be studied and mastered – consider this a cautionary tale, and feel free to call Jonathon to take advantage of his mastery of these topics.  

In Third Fed. Sav. & Loan Ass’n of Cleveland v. Koulouvaris, No. 2D17-773, 2018 WL 2271112 (Fla. 2d DCA 2018), Florida’s Second District Court of appeal analyzed, in the context of trial exhibit authentication, whether the note for a home equity line of credit (“HELOC”) was negotiable.

The Second District Court of Appeal considered whether it was proper for the Pasco County, Florida trial court to involuntarily dismiss Third Federal’s claim for foreclosure of a HELOC

Fifth Circuit Affirms Dismissal of Bankruptcy Case Due to Lack of Corporate Authority to File (and provides a blueprint for veto powers over bankruptcy filings?)

On June 14, 2018, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit issued a revised opinion that held that Federal law does not prevent a bona fide shareholder from exercising its right to vote against a bankruptcy petition just because it is also an unsecured creditor. In re Franchise Servs. of N. Am., Inc., 891 F.3d 198, 203 (5th Cir. 2018), as revised (June 14, 2018).

Franchise Services of North America, Inc. (“FSNA”) was once one of the largest rental car companies in North America. Id. at 203.  In 2012, FSNA desired to purchase Advantage Rent-A-Car and enlisted an investment bank, Macquarie Capital (U.S.A.), Inc. (“Macquarie”), to assist. Macquarie created a fully-owned subsidiary, Boketo, LLC (“Boketo”), to make a $15 million investment in FSNA.

In exchange for the capital infusion, FSNA gave Boketo 100% of its preferred stock in the form of a convertible preferred equity instrument.

Reverse Mortgage Update: New York Law Mandates New Foreclosure Notices and Certificate of Merit

Editors’ Note:  While this post is not a per se bankruptcy issue, matters on consumer financial services are always in the curtilage of bankruptcy and the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.  Our BCLP consumer financial services colleague Cathy Welker is an expert in this area, advising banks, servicers, and other financial institutions on the Byzantine regulatory world they face, not only in New York where she practices but also at the federal level.  Likewise, BCLP’s Dallas office enjoys the benefits of Greg Sachnik, a former senior banking executive deep in the front lines of TILA, RESPA, deceptive trade practices, wrongful foreclosure, and fair debt collection.  We appreciate seeing this update from them, especially as reverse mortgage issues grow exponentially – according to one study, reverse mortgage foreclosures increased by over 600 percent in recent years.  So we are pleased to re-publish it here, and for you to read

State Court Default Judgment Estops Debtor from Contesting Former In-laws’ Action to Deny Discharge in Later Bankruptcy (with bonus practice pointers!)

Just last month, the Bankruptcy Cave reported upon a Southern District of Texas case in which a debtor was denied discharge of a debt owed to an old (and likely former!?!) friend from church who had been required to pay off a student loan made to the debtor which the friend had guaranteed.  Today we report another case involving friends and family and non-dischargeable student debt from the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

The case, Ramani v. Romo (In Re Romo), Ad. Pro. No. 17-2107-dob (link for you here), was recently resolved by way of summary judgment for the plaintiffs, the debtor’s former in-laws.  As set forth in the May 14, 2018 opinion of Judge Daniel S. Opperman, the debtor entered her marriage

Equity v. Statute: In Bankruptcy, the Code Prevails (The Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors v. The Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis et al.)

Garrison Keillor once said, “Sometimes I look reality straight in the eye and deny it.”[1]  Being that the case arose in Minnesota, perhaps Circuit Judge Michael Melloy channeled Keillor, one of that state’s great humorists, when he authored the opinion in The Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors v. The Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis et al. (In re: The Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis) Case No. 17-1079 2018 WL 1954482 (8th Cir. April 26, 2018) [a link to the opinion is here].[2]  Regardless, the quote must sum up the Appellant’s view of the outcome. The unsecured creditors that make up the Committee, most of whom were victims of clergy sexual abuse, will not obtain access to the value of over 200 non-profit entities affiliated with the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis to pay their claims.

In a concise opinion, the

From Across the Pond: The BHS Saga Continues – Can a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) Ever Permanently Vary the Terms of a Lease?

Editors’ Note:  The upcoming merger between Berwin Leighton Paisner and Bryan Cave will create a 1500 lawyer, fully integrated firm with best-in-class offices in the US, UK, Europe, Russia, Hong Kong, and the UAE.  The combined Firm, to be known as Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP, will have particular strengths in real estate, financial services, litigation, and corporate practices.  Most importantly for followers of The Bankruptcy Cave, this merger will result in a cadre of restructuring professionals able to handle insolvency matters around the globe, with proven expertise in cross-border workouts, restructurings, and any other insolvency featuring international flavors.  We look forward to speaking with you any time on any insolvency matter that includes any cross-border implications.  

Article summary:

In Wright (and another) (as joint liquidators of SHB Realisations Ltd (formerly BHS Ltd) (in liquidation)) v Prudential Assurance Company Ltd, the court held that, when the BHS CVA terminated, the landlord was entitled to claim the full

Bankruptcy Court Reluctantly Allows Creditor To Shuck “Lil’ Sweet Pea” Accounts

Any first-year law student could attest that understanding what the law is can be a difficult task, in part because the law is not always applied consistently by courts.  This problem gives rise to a maxim law professors often invoke (sometimes citing Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, a proponent of this maxim) when questioned about the law’s occasional incoherence: “hard cases make bad law.”[1]  The idea is that courts are sometimes tempted to skirt the proper application of the law when the result seems harsh or unfair.  Typically, this happens when a court is faced with a particularly sympathetic party who happens to be on the wrong side of the dispute.  Although the court’s desire to avoid a harsh outcome is laudable, if the court allows this desire to distort its interpretation of the law it allows other (often less sympathetic) parties to avoid proper application of the law

In Case You Missed It – PACA Trust Rights in Bankruptcy are Just Plain Old Secured Claims

Happy 2018!  We at The Bankruptcy Cave have been itching to write about the Cherry Growers Chapter 11 case – which really is ground-breaking – but the holidays, life, and yes, work for clients too, all just got in the way.  But with each passing week, the case stayed on our minds.  So now that time permits, here is the writeup – and see below for the remarkable significance of the case.

In re Cherry Growers (now reported at 576 B.R. 569, Bankr. W.D. Mich. 2017), is a garden-variety produce-related bankruptcy case.  (Ha ha, “garden-variety” produce, get it?)  The Debtor bought produce and sold it to others, in addition to conducting other food distribution activities.  When the Debtor filed for bankruptcy, there was the typical push-and-pull between a lender secured by the Debtor’s inventory and a/r, and a supplier claiming a trust interest in those same assets, protected by the

The Magic of Mt. Gox: How Bitcoin Is Confounding Insolvency Law

Arthur C. Clarke famously observed: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” Our regulatory, legislative, and judicial systems illustrate this principle whenever new technology exceeds the limits of our existing legal framework and collective legal imagination.  Cryptocurrency, such as bitcoin, has proven particularly “magical” in the existing framework of bankruptcy law, which has not yet determined quite what bitcoin is—a currency, an intangible asset, a commodity contract, or something else entirely.

The answer to that question matters, because capturing the value of highly-volatile cryptocurrency often determines winners and losers in bankruptcy cases where cryptocurrency is a significant asset.  The recently-publicized revelation that the bankruptcy trustee of failed bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox is holding more than $1.9 billion worth of previously lost or stolen bitcoins highlights the issue.

The Mt. Gox Case: Timing is Everything

In 2013, Mt. Gox[1] was the world’s largest bitcoin exchange.  By some

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