BCLP Global Restructuring & Insolvency Developments

Global Restructuring & Insolvency Developments

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How Reporting a Crime May Subject You to Sanctions

You are a creditor and your loan is secured by personal property, let’s say equipment.  The borrower recently filed for bankruptcy protection.  You receive a phone call from a friend advising you that someone has a moving truck outside the borrower’s business location and it looks like they are stealing equipment.  You don’t know who is moving the equipment — but you do know it’s without your permission and in violation of the security agreement.  You are furious.  You think a crime is being committed and you want tell the appropriate authorities.  You call the police, file a police report and hope the police will recover the equipment so your collateral remains intact.  A few weeks later, the chapter 11 debtor files an action against you for willful violation of the automatic stay and requests sanctions again you under 11 U.S.C. 362(k)(1)!  Will you have to pay sanctions?

Believe it

Will your claim in bankruptcy withstand the test?

Within the past year bankruptcy courts and federal courts adjudicating bankruptcy appeals have further developed the law governing claims in bankruptcy which are generally governed by Sections 501 and 502 of Title 11 of the United States Code (the “Bankruptcy Code”) and related Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. Below is a discussion regarding two distinct cases that discuss the validity and priority of claims in bankruptcy.

Consumer Debt Buyers Beware: Think Before Filing A Proof of Claim

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that a Chapter 13 debtor could prosecute an adversary proceeding against a consumer debt buyer for violating the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (“FDCPA”) based on the creditor filing a proof of claim on debt which was uncollectible under the Alabama statute of limitations. Crawford v. LVNV Funding, LLC, 758 F.3d 1254 (11th Cir. 2014).

It appears the Eleventh Circuit’s decision comes in response to a

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