BCLP Global Restructuring & Insolvency Developments

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Update – Our New and Improved Set of Opening Questions and Document Questions for Your Deposition

 

Way back in 2015, we published our first edition of the most comprehensive set of opening questions for your next deposition, including follow up matters, common procedural mistakes in depositions, and the 41 questions to ask about any pertinent document.  The response was positive, which we appreciate!  In light of other depositions of ours over the past three years, and changing practices among business people (including the pervasive use of texts for everything), and more recently, the use of text-and-email-destroying-applications, we gave this list an upgrade, and decided it to publish it again for your use.

We hope you find this useful, time saving, and helpful in getting to the truth of things in your next deposition – it is located here in MS Word so you can drop it into your next deposition script in as much detail as you want.

Check back again in a few weeks –

Florida Proves Safe Haven for Individuals Liable for Breach of the PACA Trust (bonus: form complaint attached)

Editors’ Note:  For those of you who like to get something you can use from blog posts, attached here is a Form PACA Nondischargeability Complaint for a PACA seller against a party that controlled a PACA buyer, where such controlling party later files for bankruptcy.  Although, in light of the case discussed below, there is an open legal question of whether violations of the PACA trust by an individual in control of a PACA buyer result in a non-dischargeable debt under Section 523(a)(4) of the Bankruptcy Code.  To see some of our other coverage of PACA issues, a personal favorite of Leah’s and Mark’s, see here and here.

In Coosemans Miami v. Arthur (In re Arthur), the Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Florida held last week that individuals in control of a PACA trust may still receive a bankruptcy discharge of debts arising from their breach

In Case You Missed It – PACA Trust Rights in Bankruptcy are Just Plain Old Secured Claims

Happy 2018!  We at The Bankruptcy Cave have been itching to write about the Cherry Growers Chapter 11 case – which really is ground-breaking – but the holidays, life, and yes, work for clients too, all just got in the way.  But with each passing week, the case stayed on our minds.  So now that time permits, here is the writeup – and see below for the remarkable significance of the case.

In re Cherry Growers (now reported at 576 B.R. 569, Bankr. W.D. Mich. 2017), is a garden-variety produce-related bankruptcy case.  (Ha ha, “garden-variety” produce, get it?)  The Debtor bought produce and sold it to others, in addition to conducting other food distribution activities.  When the Debtor filed for bankruptcy, there was the typical push-and-pull between a lender secured by the Debtor’s inventory and a/r, and a supplier claiming a trust interest in those same assets, protected by the

BC Healthcare Restructuring Update: R CSR’s O-U-T? Less U.S. Gov’t $$ = More 11s . . . ?

Ok, if your attention span is anything like ours, all this wonky stuff about the ins and outs of the Affordable Care Act (or “ObamaCare,” as most of us know it) causes your eyes to glaze over and makes your mind wander to simpler topics, like who will win Dancing with the Stars, whether the Will & Grace reboot can make it, or how Luke may soon be revealed as the most evil Jedi of all.

But trust us, faithful reader, and you can, in about three short minutes, become a whiz on last week’s latest change to ObamaCare, which we think will lead to a lot more healthcare-related restructuring activity. So here is the 411 on last week’s termination of ObamaCare’s so-called “CSR Subsidies,” and its impact on our precarious, bankruptcy-prone, healthcare marketplace.  All presented to you in easy-to-follow FAQs!

Supreme Court Completely Endorses Critical Vendor Theory! Well, Not Completely. But Almost!

We at the Bankruptcy Cave are not very surprised by the ruling yesterday in Czyzewski v. Jevic Holding Corp.  The Supreme Court in Jevic reviewed a Bankruptcy Court’s decision to approve a settlement (with a distribution of proceeds that contravened the Bankruptcy Code’s priority scheme) in conjunction with dismissing the bankruptcy case of the Chapter 11 debtor Jevic Holding Corp. According to the Bankruptcy Court, because the distributions would occur pursuant to a “structured dismissal” rather than a confirmed plan, the failure to follow the creditor priority scheme did not bar approval.  In short, the Bankruptcy Court did not confirm a plan of reorganization for the Chapter 11 debtor, in which sufficient creditor support can re-order some of the Bankruptcy Code’s priority scheme.  Nor did the Bankruptcy Court convert Jevic’s Chapter 11 case to Chapter 7, in which the Code’s creditor priority scheme can never be changed.

Fifth Circuit Rules for PACA Claimants, and Weakens PACA, All in One Curious Ruling

Set of colored vegetables for kids

Most restructuring practitioners are aware, either vaguely or through punishing experience, of the power of PACA creditors.  PACA (or the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act, 7 U.S.C. § 499a et seq. for those who hate brevity) requires that buyers of produce hold such produce – and their proceeds – in trust for the benefit of produce sellers.  General creditors of the produce buyer receive nothing, even if they hold a lien on the buyer’s assets, until produce sellers are paid in full on any valid PACA claims (including their interest and attorneys’ fees in most instances).

But sometimes, or many times, the PACA trust assets needed to pay produce sellers are not present.  Accounts must be collected, by use of employees, lawyers, collection agents, or

The A++, Guaranteed to Go Smoothly and Make You Look Like You Do This All the Time, Timeline and Checklist to Prepare to Take a Deposition

Editor’s Note:  If you would like a copy of this document in MS Word (we know the font on this blog is hard on the eyes, we are working on it I swear, but in the meantime we are happy to send you our forms or checklists in Word), then please feel free to contact either of the authors, mark.duedall@bryancave.com or leah.fiorenza@bryancave.com.  And if you find this helpful, please check out the other “A++ Forms and Resources” we have posted to the blog, using the “Categories” drop down menu at the main page or clicking here and here.  Coming up next week:  another comprehensive checklist for preparing and filing a complaint.

The Master Deposition Timeline and Checklist

Two Weeks before Issuing the Subpoena (if you are issuing a subpoena to a non-party)

  • Please remember to run conflicts on every witness before you issue

The A++ Forms and Resources: Handling the No-Show Deposition

Editor’s Note:  Here at The Bankruptcy Cave, we love insolvency stuff; we eat it for breakfast and dream about it at night.  (We are not kidding.)  Sometimes that includes credit-related litigation, and so we keep our pre-trial, trial, and appellate skills honed.  To that end, here is a very helpful cheat sheet we prepared and which we bring with us to every deposition, just in case.  (Your author Leah even got to enjoy a no-show deposition in Chicago last year; she created a perfect record using the below.)  Feel free to use it, and if it is handier to have a Word version, email one of the authors.  We will update the post later to make it download-able, but the rudimentary blogging skills of your new editor prevent that now, alas.

Editor’s Note 2:  If you like practice tips and cheat sheets like this, see also Mark and Leah’s “The A++, Super Comprehensive, Don’t

The Guarantor Chronicles – Can a guarantor waive its right to a foreclosure confirmation proceeding?

Editor’s Note #1: This post first appeared last week on Bank Bryan Cave, a top blog on regulatory, M&A, and litigation issues for those in the banking world, located at http://www.bankbryancave.com/. Given the close relationship of this post’s topic to the world of distress, we are cross-posting it here.

Editor’s Note #2: For prior posts of interest to those involved in guarantor litigation, see Ninth Circuit Decides Issue of First Impression, Protects Insider Guarantor from Preference Liability, located at http://bclpgrid.com/ninth-circuit-decides-issue-of-first-impression-protects-insider-guarantor-from-preference-liability/.

Can a guarantor waive his right to a confirmation proceeding under Georgia law, after a non-judicial foreclosure results in a deficiency still owing? Yes.  Last week, in case closely watched by Georgia commercial real estate lenders, borrowers, and guarantors, the Supreme Court of Georgia issued its opinion in PNC Bank, N.A.  v. Smith, 2016 Ga. LEXIS 169 (Ga. Sup. Court Feb. 22, 2016). The case was

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