For lenders in many jurisdictions around the United States, the risk of post-sale litigation expense for valuation determinations can be daunting. However, in a recent unpublished opinion, the Arizona Court of Appeals concluded that once a judgment is entered, the Arizona statute providing a right to a post-sale valuation hearing does not apply if the sale occurs after judgment is entered.

In states like Arizona, there are statutory protections for obligors that require a court to conduct a valuation hearing to determine the lender’s enforceable deficiency. Recently, Bryan Cave represented a lender in attempting to recover on a defaulted loan. In that case, the borrower/guarantors were convinced that the Arizona real property securing the loan was far more valuable than what the lender could recover at a non-judicial foreclosure sale (i.e., in Arizona, a trustee’s sale).

In our case, the lender commenced a trustee’s sale simultaneously with pursuing an action